Top 8 Signs and Symptoms That You Have Cavitation and the Treatment

Top 8 Signs and Symptoms That You Have Cavitation and the Treatment

Cavitation is one of the major dental problems that most people usually end up having. You may have heard of cavities and think they are one and the same. But the two are different. While a cavity is simply a whole in the tooth caused by decay, a cavitation has two different meanings. It could mean a hole that has become so deep that it is barrowed to the bone. It also refers to the dental procedure of removing part of the bone that is infected in order to allow for the healthy bone to grow back. This is in regard to the hole in the bone. In order to tell if you have a cavitation or not, you need to be aware of the signs and symptoms to watch out for. Some of the manifestations of the condition include:

 1. Bone pain

When you have any problems with your teeth, you are bound to be in a lot of pain. However, cavitation pain is a bit different. Apart from aching inside the tooth, you may feel pain in the bone. You may also experience some pressure on top of the pain itself. It is an uncomfortable feeling that can be recognized immediately it is felt. Depending on the severity of the pain, you can how serious the condition is. For it to get as bad as becoming a cavitation, it means that it must have been ignored for a while. Since it is a hole in the bone itself, bone pain is a sure symptom that you could be having it. The only way to be sure would be to see a dentist and have them ascertain this.

 2. Bad breath

Tooth decay usually has the potential to cause bad breath. This is because it creates a breeding ground for all the bacteria in your mouth. Under the right conditions, the said bacteria eat away at your tooth, creating a cavity. This may cause rotting of the teeth in question. In turn, it would result in bad breath. Therefore, if the condition worsens and becomes a cavitation, the bad breath is likely to become worse. It is possible for it to get so bad that you are unable to talk or open your mouth in public because of the embarrassment. In some cases, you might experience some sour and bitter taste in your mouth constantly. A breath mint does not help in this situation. When you experience all these, it is a sign that you need to visit a dentist to help you find a solution to the problem you are experiencing and help you get your life back.

 3. Swelling

Sometimes a cavitation may become infected. The inflammation may cause it to swell and become red. Furthermore, pus may begin to ooze out of it. The swelling is not a normal occurrence, and neither is the pus mentioned. They are a sure sign that the area has become contaminated and hence infected. You can try to swallow antibiotics to help with the infection and over the counter anti-inflammatories to help with the infection. However, you need to keep in mind that all these are temporary fixes. The more you use that side to chew or the more you keep disturbing the area, the more likely it is that the swelling will recur. In order to have the problem solved and have a chance to live your normal life, you need to get a permanent solution. You can see a dentist for advice on the steps to take.

 4. Failed dental procedures

One of the reasons why it is important to choose a qualified dentist is to avoid botched procedures that end up causing more damage to you. You end up spending much more money than you need to fix the damage. All the while, you may be in pain that was caused by a professional you trusted to do their work well. One of the most common signs that you may have a cavitation is a dental procedure gone wrong. Whether it is a tooth extraction or a root canal, if your dental surgeon is not careful, they may put undue pressure on the bone when performing the procedure. Too much pressure, especially if the tooth is firmly fixed in its socket, may cause the bone to break or worsen the cavity at hand. If noticed at that time, it can be handled then. If not, it could lead to future complications.

Knowing about the signs and symptoms is a major part of identifying whether someone has a cavitation. Another vital step to enabling one to get back on track to living their normal life is treatment. Dental pain, when very intense, cab greatly affect someone’s quality of life and make them very unhappy. It could prevent them from going about their daily activities. This is not good as it takes away from quality time that could have been used to earn an income and provide for the family. If you are not aware, a cavitation could lead to many other complications if the infection spreads. This can even result in death. Most people never know what they are suffering from early enough. The good news is that there are ways to manage and treat cavitations before they get out of hand. Some of the factors that contribute to effective treatment and the methods of treatment include:

 1. Early diagnosis

Identifying the problem is the first step to making things right. In recent times, there are many people raising awareness about cavitations. The other day, there was news where a holistic dentist warns of a silent killer cavitations. Such awareness helps to promote early diagnosis. The more people are educated on what they should know on the condition, the more likely they are to go out and seek treatment. The problem is that it is sort of an angel of death because not many people see it coming. Some people when the experience the above symptoms just ignore it and shoulder on. When it is finally diagnosed, there is usually nothing much left to do. Early diagnosis helps to get it under control early enough. In most cases, you are able to make a full recovery with no complications.

 2. Filling

Depending on the extent of damage and how early it is diagnosed, some cavitations can be solved by filling them. If your doctor manages to ascertain that the hole is not too deep, they would recommend this option for you. If your cavitation is infected, they are likely to recommend you take antibiotics first for a particular period of time before doing the filling. If they do the feeling before the infection clears, it will only make matters worse. Your tooth will look okay from the outside but continue rotting on the inside, which is dangerous. Filling is a non-invasive procedure which involves using a paste to cover up the hole in your tooth. The paste needs a few hours to dry and set fully before you can eat. Other than that, when done well, it can be the fix you need for your problems.

 3. Root canal

Root canals tend to be a bit more intense than the fillings. It is a longer procedure. The dentist would be the best person to evaluate the extent of infection or damage on your tooth and decide on the way forward. One of the methods they could recommend for treatment is a root canal. This is if he or she feels that they cannot preserve the pulp of your tooth as it is badly infected or damaged. The procedure should not make you afraid. If carried out by a proper dentist, it has a high chance of going well. First, you will be given anesthesia to numb the affected area. So if you are experiencing a lot of pain, be sure that your dentist will not work on you until the area has been numbed. Therefore, before they start working on you, they will give you some time to allow the anesthesia to work.

 4. Extraction

This would be the last resort. In some cases, the dentist will present to you all the facts and ask you to choose between a root canal and an extraction. Some people believe that the extraction is better because it does not leave any room for the affected area to get infected in future. This is because it entails removal of the whole tooth from the bone. It requires a skilled person to do because if done badly, it could cause you a lot of pain and may even break the jawbone if not done carefully.

Most of the above methods of management and treatment take care of the affected tooth but depending on the extent of damage, could help the bone as well. In extreme cases, after the above procedures, the doctor could look into other ways of treating the affected part of the jaw bone separately.

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