Riding the Road: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing a Motorcycle for Beginners

Riding the Road: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing a Motorcycle for Beginners

If you are ready to set your spirit free on the open road, it’s time to saddle up your bike. There is no better way to see the country than on the back of a bike, and there’s no better time to get riding. So, first thing’s first: choosing your ride.

This is your ultimate guide to choosing a motorcycle for beginners. Find out what the responsibilities and requirements are for becoming a biker. Learn about the differences between different kinds of motorcycles and how to choose the right one for you.

Before You Hit the Raod…

The first consideration to make when preparing to be a bike owner is the total responsibility of ownership. Though motorcycles are much more fuel efficient and cheaper to purchase than cars, they are more dangerous.

In the event of a single-car collision, it is 28 times more likely to result in fatality if you are riding a motorcycle. A motorcycle offers no protection from other cars and no safety harness of any kind. Boring commutes become an extreme sport because motorcyclists must expose themselves to the most dangerous environment-traffic.

So, you must prepare yourself for the responsibility of riding a motorcycle. When you ride on the road, you take your life into your own hands. When you ride on the road with other traffic, you take their lives into your hands as well.

Motorcycle riding is not for the timid or immature. So, if you can handle the beast, then get ready for the ride of your life. You understand why bikers spend all their free time in the saddle the first time you’re riding down a country road on a clear summer day.

Motorcycle License

Every state has its own motorcycle licensing requirements, the same as is true for operating a motor vehicle. To get a motorcycle license in the state of California, you must pass a written exam, as well as a training program. Upon passing, the DMV charges a $35 fee for new motorcycle licenses.

Motorcycle Insurance

Motorcycle insurance is generally more affordable than car insurance. If you are over the age of 25 and have a clean record, you can find quotes around $500 or less annually.

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The total cost fluctuates depending on your area’s population density, the rate of bike theft, and even the weather. You should plan to spend between $300 to $700 a year for motorcycle insurance.

Of course, in the event of a motorcycle accident, your rates are bound to go up. It is always a good idea to have a go-to attorney in case you get into a collision on the road. Click here to find a legal adviser for motorcycle accidents.

Maintenance and Equipment Expenses

Motorcycles carry a lower upfront ticket price than cars, but the ongoing expenses add up quickly. When comparing apples to apples, a cars tires, spark plugs, belts, and rims last a lot longer than a motorcycles.

Motorcycle tires run from $350 to $700 for a set and need replacing every 3,000 to 10,000 miles. All things considered, plan on around $1,500 a year for motorcycle parts and maintenance.

Biker Gear

Motorcycle gear is an essential expense for beginner riders. The jacket, pants, and gloves should be high-abrasion grade leather to protect your skin from scrapes. But not all riders opt to wear protective leather gear.

The piece of gear that every rider needs-no matter what-is a helmet. Economy biker helmets start around $150 and go up to around $1,000. If you worry about taking a spill on your bike (which every new biker does at some point) plan on spending around $1,000 on gear.

Ultimate Guide to Choosing a Motorcycle for Beginners

Motorcycles have come a long way from their beginnings. All the way up through the late 20th century, motorcycles were either street or dirt. Today, there are dozens of specialized kinds of bikes for every terrain imaginable.

The best motorcycle for beginners is one that is built for the kind of terrain you ride on and easy to handle. The price of these bikes run between around $4,000 to over $10,000. The best beginner motorcycles are, either, a sport, cruiser, or touring bike.

Sportbike

Sportbikes are the slim, sleek speedsters of the motorcycle world. They are the ones that make the “zoom-zoom” sound, as opposed to the “vroom-vroom” sound. Sportbikes are fun to ride through town or on back roads, but they are not for offroading or cross-country riding.

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Sportbikes provide a speedy ride and good braking power. They can be a lot to handle for a new rider, though. And they carry a bigger learning curve for newbies.

If what you want is speed, a sportbike is a great choice. If you’re looking for a bike to commute with or ride for any distance, a sportbike is not the right choice.

Cruiser

Cruisers are, often, the most popular choice among new riders. They are low-slung, torch-heavy, and ergonomic for comfort. Cruisers are a great option if you want to use your motorcycle for commuting and travel.

Cruisers accommodate saddlebags, windscreens, and some have a backrest. Beginners should look for a lightweight or medium cruiser. You won’t win races against a sportbike, but you will enjoy the ride more.

Touring Bike

Touring bikes are specifically built for long rides cross-country. They feature many of the amenities drivers are used to from cars. You can opt for a touring bike with Bluetooth connectivity, heated seats, and a GPS heads-up display.

Most touring bikes accommodate luggage in weatherproof storage spaces. They are great bikes for beginners but are generally higher in price.

Final Thoughts

The right bike for you depends on how you want to use it. When choosing a bike go for something that is easy to maintain and handle on the road. And always remember your responsibility to yourself and others on the road as a motorcyclist.

Now hit the road and have fun!

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