8 High-Paying Healthcare Careers That Don’t Involve Any Body Fluids

8 High-Paying Healthcare Careers That Don't Involve Any Body Fluids

Healthcare is America’s biggest employer, with one in eight people now working in the US healthcare industry.

Forty-two percent of employment in healthcare relates to nursing. But the majority of new jobs in the industry are not in clinical roles. The biggest growth is in administrative jobs, such as clerks and receptionists.

For passionate healthcare supporters who are also a little squeamish, these and other non-clinical healthcare careers offer an opportunity to contribute to the industry, while also earning an excellent salary.

Here are some high-paying non-clinical jobs that could interest you.

1. Healthcare Management

As this guide to healthcare careers shows, there are many non-clinical jobs. And one of the highest paying roles is as a medical or healthcare manager.

These management roles can involve running specific departments within a larger facility. But some managers are in charge of an entire medical facility. Such roles come with a lot of responsibility. Not least because you must ensure that your facility complies with ever-changing legislation.

Most healthcare managers work in hospitals. Although some work in nursing homes and medical practices. The role may involve managing staff, budgeting and implementing workplace policies.

Some medical managers have a clinical background. But it’s more common for managers to work their way up from other non-clinical hospital jobs. As well as interpersonal and leadership skills, medical managers often have an MBA.

2. Clinical Educator

Clinical educators ensure healthcare workers have the skills to succeed within their unit. Often, this involves coordinating with facility administrators to learn what training nurses need.

Clinical educators also arrange and check training programs. And, they work with organizational experts to plan the training sessions.

Another function of a clinical educator is to regulate staff and patient safety. They do this by holding regular in-service training sessions for healthcare workers.

3. Medical Billers and Coders

Medical billing and coding can sometimes be separate roles. Although, more often, they go hand in hand. As such, most billers know medical coding and most coders also work in billing.

READ  The Best Offense Is a Good Defense: How to Find a Criminal Defense Lawyer

Medical coding involves assigning the appropriate code to each patient’s documentation. Medical billers then submit this documentation to the insurance company for reimbursement.

Billers and coders need strong analytical skills and excellent attention to detail. They must also know specific terminology and practices. And they need to be able to use record-keeping and coding software.

4. Medical Writer

Medical writing involves producing informed content for textbooks, pharmaceuticals, and medical equipment.

Medical writers must have a thorough understanding of the medical world. They must also be able to present this information in a clear manner. As such, many doctors pursue it as an alternative career after working in a clinical setting.

It’s also possible to become a medical writer after studying a writing-based profession. These might include journalism, creative writing or English.

Medical writers can work for pharmaceutical or medical equipment companies. But more often they are freelance and work remotely. This makes the role ideal if you want a flexible non-clinical healthcare job.

5. Expert Medical Witness

Non-clinical healthcare roles can also appeal to stressed doctors who want a change.

One of the many possible jobs for doctors outside of medicine is as an expert medical witness. This could involve testifying in malpractice suits. Or, you could use your clinical expertise to provide support for a medical-related legal argument.

For some doctors, this can feel like joining ‘the dark side’. You may have to provide testimony against a liable physician. Although you would also get to defend doctor decisions.

Working as an expert witness can be a lucrative career path for former doctors. And it can be an opportunity to ensure justice and accountability within the medical profession.

6. Informatics Nurse

Unlike most nursing roles, working as an informatics nurse is one of many healthcare careers with little patient contact.

Informatics nurses check and install clinical IT applications within healthcare facilities. Informatics nurses also train and educate the staff to use any new systems. This ensures that all staff members are using this technology to its full potential.

READ  Know why your business requires an efficient Call Center Software

The role of an informatics nurse is ideal for those with an excellent knowledge of technology. But you must also have strong analytical skills and a good capacity for project management.

7. Healthcare Consultant

Healthcare consultants find ways to improve and reorganize infrastructure in various medical settings. These can include hospitals, cancer treatment facilities, labs, and pharmaceutical companies.

Through research and analysis, healthcare consultants identify problems within the specific healthcare setting. To do so, they analyze revenue and employment numbers, and conduct staff interviews.

The healthcare consultant then presents methods to improve work efficiency or save money. These methods can involve advising on finances, healthcare consumption or technology integration.

8. Medical Interpreter

Medical interpreters are essential to provide a voice for patients who speak little to no English.

Language barriers are always challenging. But in a clinical setting, a misunderstanding could be life-threatening. When patients can’t express their symptoms, this can compromise medical care. This is also the case if patients are unable to understand important health instructions.

Medical interpreters must have language skills and in-depth knowledge of medical terminology. But, with strong growth in their field, interpreters can expect to be more in-demand than ever before.

Your Guide to Non-Clinical Healthcare Careers

As this list shows, they are many non-clinical healthcare careers to choose from.

And, many of these make ideal choices for those who prefer little patient contact or aren’t keen on the sight of blood. Plus, while healthcare jobs and salaries vary, these roles are all well-paid with great prospects.

For more job-related updates and information, check out our career advice.

Facebook Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.