5 Ways You Can Stay in Shape After 65

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If you or someone you care for is approaching 65, you’ve probably already noticed some health and wellness changes. However, these changes do not have to result in a substantial decrease in activity. By staying in shape, adults of all ages can keep their energy levels high.

Through these five proven diet and exercise methods, seniors can retain a youthful schedule and stay in shape after 65.

1. Eat Healthy Foods

Much of the work that is done to keep a senior in shape occurs in the kitchen and dining room. There are several key eating habits and healthy foods that a senior should try to work into their life.

Complex carbohydrates, for instance, play a vital role in maintaining an active lifestyle for any adult. These are the foods that store and release energy in a healthy and efficient way.

You’ll want to introduce more whole grains into your diet, especially as a replacement for any simple carbohydrates you are eating, like white bread or junk food. As a rule of thumb: if it is processed, then it isn’t a healthy complex carbohydrate.

This change will bring two benefits that will make staying in shape easier. First, you’ll be cutting out foods that produce extra bodily fat, keeping you in better shape. Second, complex carbohydrates will give you the energy you need to exercise – a must for anyone looking to stay in shape.

2. Supplements

There are also several supplements you should consider consuming. These extra vitamins and minerals will help fine-tune your diet for a healthy lifestyle.

Potassium can be difficult for many older adults to absorb naturally from food in the same way as young people. However, potassium is essential for many different bodily processes. For many of the same reasons, magnesium should be consumed regularly. Omega-3 fatty acids are also highly beneficial to seniors trying to stay in shape after 65 as they can help to slow several types of age-related degradation.

3. Stretching

Ways You Can Stay in Shape

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A regular stretching routine has several benefits for seniors looking to stay in shape. Firstly, it promotes blood flow, which has many health advantages of its own. Second, it loosens muscles and increases flexibility, which is invaluable for injury prevention. Preventing injuries will keep you healthy for our next two tips for staying in shape beyond 65.

Remember, it’s not about the amount of time you take in stretching, it’s about how many times in the day or week you stretch. Stretching more often instead of stretching for longer periods of time will increase flexibility and improve mobility.

4. Cardio

A healthy heart is essential to staying in shape. Even a brief daily walk (around 30 minutes) can do wonders for your health.

Proper heart health prevents heart attacks and other cardiovascular complications. Additionally, a healthy heart increases your energy levels, making it easier to maintain other aspects of your health. 

5. Strength Training

Strength training might seem like a younger person’s exercise; however, many of the same movements are perfect for aging adults. There is also a wide variety of strength training chair exercises for seniors that are safe, simple, and effective. These exercises can be a part of your daily routine anywhere because they only require a chair and maybe a couple of household items.

Additionally, increased skeletal muscle strength can do wonders for anyone experiencing issues with balance or falling.

Parting Thoughts

As you get older, your body is going to need a bit more leeway when working to stay in shape after 65. Older adults are more prone to injury, so be very careful and remember that your safety is the most important thing.

Try not to become frustrated if you don’t see results as fast as you expect. Your body might not be as responsive to exercise and diet as it once was, but you will eventually see the benefits of eating healthy food and exercising.

Author’s Bio:

Joseph Jones has been writing senior care and aging-related articles for years. He got his start while writing for a personal blog before he was offered to work at California Mobility in 2018 as the Content Marketing Manager, creating highly informative guides and health awareness articles for aging adults.

He’s currently contributing to a variety of blogs in the senior health industry in hopes to spread information about taking care of seniors and what to expect in the aging process.

Sources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/aging/art-20046070

https://gerontology.usc.edu/resources/infographics/necessity-exercise-physical-activity-and-aging/

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/19529.htm

https://medlineplus.gov/potassium.html

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002423.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4210907/

https://www.asccare.com/the-benefits-of-stretching-exercises-for-seniors/

https://californiamobility.com/21-chair-exercises-for-seniors-visual-guide/

https://www.verywellfit.com/cardio-exercise-guidelines-for-seniors-1230952

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3885846/

Why Reaching Your Fitness Goals Is Primarily About Diet

If you’ve heard the saying that weight management is 80 percent diet and 20 percent working out, there’s something to it. You can’t out-exercise a bad diet, which is why your nutrition needs to be at the foundation of your goals. However, remember that what you eat isn’t just about feeding your muscles and reducing fat cell size. In fact, nutrition also affects the mind, which is why your diet can fight fatigue, help mentally get you through a workout, and get you excited about taking a new class or going up in free weights.

It really is mind of matter, and your “matter” is what you’re trying to control. It’s a great idea to work in tandem with a nutritionist and personal trainer if you’re at the start of your journey (or anywhere along the way). These experts can help you pinpoint what it is you want to achieve and map out the best way to do it. After all, if you don’t know what you want to do, how will you know the tools you need to get there?

Reducing fat cells

There’s no such thing as “losing weight” unless you get surgery such as liposuction. All you can do is reduce or increase the size of your fat cells. Everyone is born with a set amount. Diet is at the core of reducing fat cells, although it’s more complicated than calories in/calories out. Still, this is a very basic framework, and it’s important to understand the caloric content of what you’re consuming. Even more important is making sure what is within those calories to nourish your body.

Reducing the number of calories you consume will likely reduce your fat cell size. However, even with working out, you can’t target fat loss areas. Everyone also has a natural shape and often pockets of fat that are too stubborn to move. The best way around this is to contour your body by building muscle in key areas to help off-set this natural tendency. That’s where muscle mass comes into play.

Some people, particularly women, shy away from building muscle because they think it will make them look too masculine. As a woman, this isn’t possible—women simply don’t have the hormone balance to achieve a masculine look. Everyone should focus on muscle mass because sarcopenia (age-related muscle loss) begins to really kick in during your thirties and increases with every decade. Muscles are important for daily activities, protecting the body, and keeping you strong.

Muscle mass

There’s no such thing as “toning.” Muscles can either shrink or grow. Toning usually means reducing fat cells and increasing muscle size simultaneously. However, simply strength training isn’t enough. Muscles need to be fed with protein immediately after a strength training session. Aim to consume at least 20 grams of protein right after a strength training session to kickstart the muscle healing process. If you don’t feed your muscles, and this includes the right amount of calories for you, they won’t grow. Worse, they might tear and be damaged from strength training without proper nutrition.

No matter your fitness goals, make sure diet is a critical part of the process. Otherwise, you’ll be working against yourself and will likely never see the results you crave.