What Can Drugs Do to Your Body and Brain?

Human beings have taken drugs since time-in-memorial. Many of the ancient civilizations were known to have used hallucinogenic mushrooms that grew naturally around them.

But that is not to say that drugs are good for you, more that they just didn’t fully understand the scientific consequences of them.

Equally, today many drugs are not completely natural or plant-based. In fact, they are synthetically produced in factories or extra components are added in order to make them more potent.

These extras are often dangerous and prevent takers from determining the potency of what they are taking.

So just what can drugs do to your body? Here are examples of what just how two drugs can affect you.

Cannabis

Recently legalized in 10 U.S States and Washington D.C this drug is a depressant like alcohol that can numb your central nervous system. In the short term, this drug means you cannot concentrate properly or respond to situations with the fast reactions you usually can.

This is why it is illegal to drive a motor vehicle under the influence of drugs.

In the long term, the drug can have an extremely damaging effect on your brain as well as your lifestyle, as all drugs can. Cannabis can make you paranoid and can cause schizophrenia.

In fact, a recent study showed that those that had tried cannabis by the time they were 18 were more than twice as likely to develop schizophrenia.

Check out this website if you want to learn more about how drugs like cannabis affect your brain.

Cocaine

This drug is the opposite of alcohol and cannabis It is a stimulant that causes a high that lasts for around 30 minutes before an extreme crash, often leaving the user wanting to take more.

The sudden increase in heart rate can make the user more prone to a heart attack, breathing problems or even a stroke.

Unlike some other drugs the more you take cocaine the more you need for a stronger high the next time around. And the more you take the more it can cause sleep deprivation, hallucination or even psychosis.

Also unlike cannabis which is known to famously cause outbreaks of the so-called munchies during the comedown, where the users become obsessively hungry, cocaine causes a loss of appetite meaning after a while the user becomes thin and underweight.

Another long term effect of cocaine is the physical appearance of the nose. As the drug is snorted it effects and irritates the mucous membrane in your nose which absorbs the drug into your bloodstream.

Eventually, this irritation can cause a problem as it can create sores and even the collapse of the septum – the wall dividing each nasal chamber.

What Can Drugs Do to Your Body? Now You Know

Drugs can have an extremely harmful effect on your body. You might have heard lots of anecdotal evidence in the news media or maybe you have friends who take drugs and say that they are not too bad.

However, it is important to know the science behind the question “what can drugs do to your body?”.

If you are interested in more articles about drugs, be sure to check out our section on them on our website.

How Does Drug Abuse Affect Your Lifestyle?

Addiction is never a one-way street. When you are addicted to alcohol and other substances, you start exhibiting behaviors that are not only harmful to you but also everyone and everything around you. The unpleasant behaviors begin to affect your loved ones and your lifestyle which becomes extremely hard to control.

Unfortunately, most addicted individuals dwell in denial, and some do not understand the impact of their behaviors to others let alone those they care about. To help you understand, let’s have a look at how drug abuse adversely affects your lifestyle.

It affects your freedom

Drugs can put you in the form of jail that you will never know you are in. No more happiness, no more friends, you go short of finances, affects your job and your relationship with others become miserable. Also, substance abuse could get you in a real jail. You may find yourself engaging in crimes, stealing as you try to raise funds to acquire drugs and other myriad activities that will only lead you to the wrong side of the law and eventually you are put in jail. Your mental and physical freedom is highly interfered with.

Harms your career

Regardless of the kind of drug that you take, substance abuse can have severe consequences when trying to get and maintaining a decent job. You may start experiencing sleeplessness, and impaired judgment which makes you perform poorly and the less are low productivity. In the long run, the results will be excessive lateness and absenteeism and other undependable behaviors that will leave your boss with no other choice but to sack you.

Affect your relationships

Some drugs are characterized by aggressive behaviors where you start being abusive to your family members and friends. This will eventually ruin your relationship as no one will want to associate with you. What’s more? Once you become an addict, your priorities changes. You will no longer have time to spend with your loved ones as all your time, effort and resources shifts to drugs. You start missing on important family events such as weddings or baby showers. You do not have time for your spouse and kids and in the end; the results will be a broken family.

Affects your finances

Drugs cost money and a lot of it. The more you keep using them, the more you spend. It gets worse when you become an addict. You find yourself spending all your money on supporting the habit and saving gets hard. Combining this with the effects of drug abuse on your career makes the situation worse. Your life becomes miserable where affording the basics such as food and clothes becomes a challenge.

Everyone wants to live a happy and manageable life. From these points, it is evident that drug abuse and addiction come with an unpleasant lifestyle. Happiness becomes rare, and you cannot afford the things you need to live a happy life. You become lonely, and you start pushing everyone and everything you love away. Do not wait until it gets to this point. Get help from professionals and let them help you get over the habit.  You can find the right rehab center near you by doing an online search and check on reputable sites such https://www.findrehabcenters.org/north-carolina/winston-salem/ as for directions. All the best!

Noticing Signs of Early Addiction

The rising number in deaths due to addiction around the country is alarming and cause for taking a closer look at our friends and family who might be in danger. So many people think that it will never happen to someone like him or her, or someone they know and love, but the reality of the matter is that no one is safe from a disease like addiction. Sometimes, family members and friends of someone who was lost to addiction look back on the lost life and can’t identify where it all went wrong. Unfortunately, some addicts can hide their secret so well that not even their closest friends know something is wrong. Other times, the addict is in complete denial of their problem and attempts to assure loved ones that they have it under control. For these reasons, it’s important that people are able to pinpoint where things may be taking a turn for the worse.

Every journey down addiction road is different, but with that, many of the tell tale signs are the same. Nexus Recovery Services blog has identified 5 stages of addiction, and how realizing these stages while they’re happening can save a life in the long run.

1. Experimentation

The first stage of addiction is experimentation. This is a tough sign to identify because so many people drink alcohol or need to take prescription drugs for physical or mental pain. Some of the main reasons for experimentation are to “take the edge off”, to fit in, or to enhance performance in some cases. If your friend is taking prescription medications for a legitimate reason, it isn’t cause for a red flag. If however, they should be fully recovered and they’re still seeking new sorts of pain relief, this might be the beginning of an experimental problem. It’s also a bad sign when your friend or family member move up in the level of drugs they’re using; say marijuana to cocaine.

2. Regular use 

The next stage of addiction as identified by Nexus Recovery Services blog post is regular use. If you and your buddies go out and drink every Saturday night, it’s not much cause for concern. If however he or she begins drinking alone in non-social situations, or makes alcohol or drug use a patterned habit, it could be a red flag.

3. Risky use

This stage of addiction is a sure sign of an underlying problem. Where the first two stages might be fuzzy on if you should step in or not, this stage is where intervention definitely needs to occur. When alcohol or drug use starts affecting the person’s everyday life, something is wrong. Some examples include putting others at risk by drinking and driving, causing a strain on their relationships, putting themselves in financial troubles to fund their habits or pay for wrongdoings while under the influence. Things are only going to get worse in the next stages of addiction.

4. Dependence

Dependence happens right before there is a full-blown addiction. If the person starts to suffer from withdrawal symptoms when they’re not under the influence, their body is beginning to depend on the substance. This doesn’t yet mean that the person is addicted, but it is a symptom. They may also begin to build up a tolerance in this stage, meaning they need more to feel the same or might move onto a stronger substance altogether.

5. Addiction

The last stage is full-blown addiction. Even if the person is experiencing harmful effects due to the substance, they’re still using it. The addiction becomes out of control when it’s compulsive and controls the addict’s life and relationships. It will be extremely difficult if not impossible for someone in this stage to recover from his or her addiction without the help of medical professionals.

If you feel that your might be traveling down the path of addiction, there is no shame in asking for help early. If you see your friend or family member entering these stages of addiction, it would be wise to contact a medical professional for advice and help.