5 Unique Careers In The Healthcare Industry

healthcare career

Healthcare is the fastest-growing industry in terms of employment in the U.S. In the year 2000, there were 7 million more manufacturing jobs in the U.S than in healthcare jobs. In 2018 however, healthcare surpassed manufacturing with 16 million healthcare jobs recorded vs. just a little over 12 million manufacturing jobs.

There were many factors that led to the increased use of healthcare over the past two decades. From an aging baby boomer population to the advent of new technologies and procedures, but what is clear is that if you are looking for employment it may be time to consider the healthcare industry. 

Everyone knows the most common industry jobs, like nurses and pharmacists, but there are many unique opportunities within healthcare that may surprise the layman. 

Patient Advocate

Are you a people person? Do you love being there for loved ones in times of need? If so, being a patient advocate may just be the perfect position for you. 

Patient advocates spend their time explaining complex policies, procedures, and services to patients. They often interview patients and family members so they can address their concerns, and ensure their needs are met.  

In today’s often convoluted healthcare system patients need someone on their side, that is the role of a patient advocate.

Patient advocates also aren’t required to have a college degree so the position is attainable for a large percentage of the population.

Respiratory Therapist

Respiratory therapists are specialists in pulmonary medicine. They have a wide variety of responsibilities including education, diagnosis, and treatment of people who are suffering from breathing problems. 

They can either graduate with an associate’s, bachelor’s, or master’s degree in respiratory therapy. The most educated therapists tend to end up in emergency rooms, while those with associate degrees usually work in outpatient care facilities or in-home practices. 

All levels of respiratory therapists are required to be certified by the NBRC (National Board for Respiratory Care). There are seven unique specializations within respiratory therapy as well, they include: CRT (Certified Respiratory Therapist), RRT (Registered Respiratory Therapist), CPFT and RPFT (Certified or Registered Pulmonary Function Technologist), ACCS (Adult Critical Care Specialist), NPS (Neonatal/Pediatric Specialist), and SDS (Sleep Disorder Specialist).

The variety of levels and specializations within respiratory care means the career is a great opportunity no matter your level of education. All healthcare jobs are rewarding, but respiratory therapists have the responsibility of keeping people alive in the direst of times, making this one of the most fulfilling careers around.

Dental Ceramist

Dental laboratories partner with dentists to create dentures, crowns, and bridges for their patients. The job of a dental ceramist is to form these dental implants using precision craftsmanship.

Dental ceramists need to have in-depth knowledge of dental anatomy and terminology. However, they aren’t required to have college degrees, so this is a great opportunity for entry-level job seekers.

Dental ceramists also have one of the highest-paying professions in the healthcare field that doesn’t require a college degree. On average ceramists pull in over $62,000 a year.

Speech-Language Pathologist Assistant

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are specialized physicians who attempt to prevent,  diagnose, and treat speech, language, communication and swallowing disorders in their patients. They are required to be certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (AHSA).

A speech-language pathologist assistant aids the physician in the treatment process. Not every state allows the use of SLPs assistants, but those that do offer a great potential career for entry-level job seekers.

If you are interested in becoming an SLPs you must acquire the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) in Speech-Language Pathology. Then you are on your way to a rewarding and fruitful career.

Wound Care Specialist

Those afraid of blood need not apply. 

Wound care specialists are some of the most specialized nurses and physicians around. Their job is not easy. They are required to clean, treat and dress the wounds of patients. They also help educate families and patients on at-home wound care. 

All wound care specialists are required to be certified by the American Academy of Wound Management (AAWM) and physicians are further required to be certified as Certified Wound Specialist Physician (CWSP). 

Wound care specialists have a brutal, emotionally taxing job that many simply don’t want. However, they are paid handsomely for their services. Wound care specialist nurses make an average of over $90,000 annually.

The healthcare industry is booming, so if you are looking for employment it only makes sense to try your luck in healthcare. Many of the most common jobs, however, are facing stiff competition, so don’t be afraid to apply to some of the more unique careers in the industry.

It pays to be unique.

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Author: mindmingles

I believe in creativity and try to express the same with my words. I enjoy writing and keeping myself in touch with the books.

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